FINRA TARGETS DIVERSITY, RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN, BLACKS

FINRA TARGETS DIVERSITY, RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN, BLACKS

ENOUGH ABUSES FROM FINRA 

FINRA, the rigid straitjacket of financial regulation, brazenly ran one of the most successful and few high-profile women off of Wall Street and into the Silicon Valley.Ruth Porat, the highest ranked female on Wall Street has left Morgan Stanley for Google — and that the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), which oversees brokers and broker dealers, is the impartial — and corrupt — Wall Street watchdog, headed by amultimillionaire Richard Ketchum as its Chairman and CEO.

While the average American family’s ANNUAL income barely goes above $55,000, FINRA pays its CEO Richard Ketchum $300,000 per month to head the “non-profit” FINRA. Is there anything wrong here? Correct, FINRA’s “non-profit” status is a facial mask to fool the American public while the FINRA bureaucrats collect millions of dollars each year extorting SMALL businesses.

Read More: FINRA CEO RICHARD KETCHUM PLAYED LIKE A FOOL, SPONSORS RACISM

Following the financial crisis that began in 2008 when many banks and financial institutions closed their doors, new waves of regulation to control the more daring investment strategies were forced on those that remained. The straitjacket of overregulation emanating from FINRA is the main reason Ruth Porat’s departure. In the mostly white male world of Wall Street, diversity is not a dirty word but something seen to be tolerated, not embraced or encouraged. No woman has ever been at the very top of a Wall Street investment bank and with its most-powerful female executive departing for Google, that likely won’t happen any time soon either.

Read More: CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA RUBBER STAMP, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL PROFESSOR IMPLICATED IN MULTIPLE FRAUD, ABUSER CAUGHT

Before leaving to take over the same title in Silicon Valley, Ruth Porat was one of the only female CFOs in the financial industry and, by far, the most powerful. This is a woman who was not only respected for her high acumen across the board by the industry in the U.S., but around the world as well. While high numbers of women entered and became successful in the financial industry in the 1980s, there has since been a rollback on that progress with many leaving or not pursuing financial careers as studies show men continue to dominate in the traditionally male-led industry, largely due to regulatory abuses by FINRA.

In 2013, President Barack Obama was rumored to be considering Ruth Porat for the next Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, the nation’s second-in-command of the money supply and fiduciary policies. Instead, Porat took on an even bigger challenge that threatened to topple our entire financial system, and she showed incredible leadership and courage during the financial crisis. Despite having a chance at a high-profile government gig, Porat opted to help pull Morgan Stanley out of the depths of its woes. Not only did people like her help stabilize a vital American financial institution, the work done to assist major companies’ recovery was a first step toward getting the country’s economy ­— and that of the world at large — back on its feet.

SUSAN AXELROD, ALAN LAWHEAD, CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA EXPOSED

SUSAN AXELROD, ALAN LAWHEAD, CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA EXPOSED

Read More: AEGIS CAPITAL FIGHTS BACK AT FINRA BLACKMAIL, RACISM

Anyone questioning this move should be asking themselves why the sudden, drastic career change? The reason is simple if the way in which FINRA regularly operates is understood.

The authority came to be in 2007 when the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) merged with the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) to create FINRA. Since inception and the coming of the 2008 recession, FINRA has produced massive overregulation, regulatory abuse and has operated with discriminatory investigative practices which have only become worse and worse each and every year.

Supposedly, FINRA regulates all firms evenly, however those in the business and on the Street know the regulatory body goes particularly hard against small brokerage firms. Even more egregiously, it targets black brokers and now with Porat, FINRA may have chased off the most successful woman in the business as well.

TALMAN HARRIS, AFRICAN AMERICAN “TURNED INTO CHARCOAL”, FINRA RACISM EXPOSED

FINRA has unfairly singled out black brokers and “turned them into charcoal” under FINRA abuses. TALMAN HARRIS, an investment professional with a 20 year, clean regulatory history was barred from FINRA in December 2014.

CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA STAFFER JEFFREY BLOOM, RACISTS EXPOSED

CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA STAFFER JEFFREY BLOOM, RACISTS EXPOSED

A notorious racist, FINRA staffer JEFFREY BLOOM was caught making an egregious statement,“FINRA will nail those black bastards in New York.“ Yes, FINRA racist Jeffrey Bloom “burned” the innocent black American broker Talman Harris.

CHRIS BRUMMER, FACULTY, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL

CHRIS BRUMMER, FACULTY, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL SCREWS UP MY LIFE…

CHRIS BRUMMER, GEORGETOWN PROFESSOR SCREWED UP MY PREGNANT MOTHER”, OUTRAGE FROM AN UNBORN CHILD

TALMAN HARRIS has a real problem in the world of FINRA: Talman Harris is a black American and we all know what the blacks were called the “N word” just a few decades ago. There is no evidence against Talman Harris. There is no reason to kill his career and there is no reason to put his unborn baby’s future in the limbo only because the dumb academic CHRIS BRUMMER, FINRA’s rubber stamp NATIONAL ADJUDICATORY COUNCIL (NAC) wanted to single out Mr. Harris as a TARGET to destroy.

Read More:  FINRA LACKEY MYLES EDWARDS, DISGRACED CONSTELLATION WEALTH ADVISORS LAWYER IMPLICATED IN RONEN ZAKAI FELONY CONVICTION

MEET CHRIS BRUMMER, THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY FINRA UNCLE TOM EXPOSED

CHRIS BRUMMER, Georgetown Law School professors asks: “Does the truth matter in FINRA hearings?” The answer is “No”. In the book of FINRA, it is a white men’s elite club. Uncle Tom Chris Brummer is the exception. Talman Harris could not possibly get ahead, he is black and he was called the “N word” by the racist FINRA staffer Jeffrey Bloom. As far as Chris Brummer, Chris Brummer is no doubt the 21st century “Uncle Tom” for FINRA.

“CHRIS BRUMMER has no regulatory background whatsoever. CHRIS BRUMMER is an academic with hardly any experience in the real world,” says American patriot Talman Harris. “I am very upset with Chris Brummer and his other FINRA cronies that have targeted me and destroyed my life only because I am BLACK. I have very serious claims against them individually and against FINRA. CHRIS BRUMMER owes my good name back – a professional with a 20 year clean regulatory history; CHRIS BRUMMER has screwed up my life; CHRIS BRUMMER has screwed over my pregnant wife, and CHRIS BRUMMER has screwed up the future of my unborn child! ”  

Read More: FINRA BARRED TWO INNOCENT BLACK BROKERS BASED ON BS, RACISM, TRASHES THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION

CHRIS BRUMMER, PROFESSOR, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL LECTURES

CHRIS BRUMMER, PROFESSOR, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL LECTURES

FINRA RUBBER STAMP CHRIS BRUMMER THREATENS JOURNALISTS, EXPOSED  

In January 2015, FINRA’s notorious rubber stamp, an obscure FINRA National Adjudicatory Council (NAC) headed by CHRIS BRUMMER, a Georgetown University academic affirmed FINRA’s racially motivated decision. Since then, CHRIS BRUMMER has repeatedly harassed journalists and attempted to silence the media that has exposed his undisclosed payments received from convicted felons.

JULIE BAUER, (Tel: 202-7288217, Email: julie.bauer@finra.org ), FINRA’s head of government relations declined to comment on FINRA’s regulatory abuses against Talman Harris. Talman Harris’s first child is due in June 2015…

Under the thumb of CHRIS BRUMMER, research shows FINRA’s NAC has ruled in favor of FINRA staff 100% of the time. Has Chris Brummer committed fraud  in a FINRA Kangaroo Court headed by Chris Brummer?  It’s obvious.

FINRA STAFFER JEFFREY BLOOM, CHRIS BRUMMER, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL, REGULATORY ABUSERS, FRAUD

RACIST FINRA STAFFER JEFFREY BLOOM, CHRIS BRUMMER, GEORGETOWN LAW SCHOOL, REGULATORY ABUSERS, FRAUD

At some point the question has to be asked: When is someone, a group of people or a campaign against FINRA going to curtail or finally put an end to this abuse? How many hard-working brokers will be targeted and taken down by the regulatory body because their crime in FINRA’s eyes is being black? And how many powerful Wall Street women do we have to lose before people begin saying “enough is enough?”

If FINRA can push a well-respected and seasoned 28-year veteran off Wall Street all the way to the Silicon Valley, then the rest of the industry simply doesn’t have a fighting chance against the likes of its Chairman and CEO Rick Ketchum or Alan Lawhead, director of its Appellate Group, or a MICHAEL GARAWSKI, a FINRA bureaucrat that only exists in the shadow — or the blatantly biased regulators Jeffrey Bloom and Robert Morris.

FINRA stinks from top down like anything sick and rotten. These are just a few of the slimy characters spreading their mess all over the Street. It’s about time FINRA’s overregulation and the handcuffing of Wall Street executives is exposed to the light of scrutiny. It might be time to do some serious spring cleaning.

BENJAMIN WEY — TURN MONEY INTO MORE MONEY WITH CURRENCY TRADING

Benjamin-Wey-Turn-Money-Into-More-Money-With-Currency-Trading

Benjamin Wey is a financier and a journalist.

A graduate of Columbia University, Benjamin Wey has two master’s degrees and almost two decades of operational experience in the fields of marketing and management science. He shares his thoughts and advice with our readers:

They say it takes money to make money. This has never been truer than in currency trading. The international currency market, called the foreign exchange market (“forex” or “FX” for short), is the single largest financial market in the entire world, trumping stocks, bonds, derivatives and anything else you can throw at it with over $4 trillion in activity daily. It was once solely the stomping ground of behemoth financial institutions, but now the average investor can try to grab a piece of that trillion-dollar pie through online trading. Take a look at this intro to trading currency on the foreign exchange market.

Trading in currency is often compared to trading in stocks, except, in a way, you are buying stock in a country. You are buying a country’s currency in the hopes that the country will perform well economically and therefore increase the value of its currency and, in turn, your investment. The value of a currency is based on its relationship to other currencies, so in the forex, currencies are quoted in pairs. This may seem odd, but currency is the standard by which all things measure their value. The market value of a commodity is just based on how much currency it is worth, so the same is true with currency itself.

There are many pairs, but there are four major pairs that account for the majority of trading:

  • The British Pound and U.S. Dollar (GBP/USD)
  • The Euro and U.S. Dollar (EUR/USD)
  • The U.S. Dollar and Swiss Franc (USD/CHF)
  • The U.S. Dollar and Japanese Yen (USD/JPY)

Let’s take the GBP/USD pair. In this pair, the GBP is what is called the base currency and the USD is the quote currency. The base currency is the first currency listed in a pair. Today you would see a quote that says this:

GBP/USD= 1.66

That means that it would take $1.66 USD to buy a single British Pound. The pair always shows how much of the quote currency it takes to equal a single unit of base currency. If you bought in at this price for a single pound and the quote went up to, say, 1.70 because the British economy went on an upswing, the value in American dollars would go up. So you paid $1.66 and now you have $1.70 in pounds and you can sell that pound back for American money and make a $.04 profit. Of course, you can’t just buy a single unit on the forex.

In order to trade currency, you will have to go through an online broker. These brokers are much different than stock brokers because the forex is much different from the stock market.  There is no exchange on which currency is traded, but banks and other financial institutions trade amongst themselves all over the world. Brokers don’t charge commissions like stock brokers, but instead make their money on the spread. The spread is the small difference, measured in fractions calledpips, between what they will buy a currency at (bid price) and what they will sell a currency at (ask price).

An example quote would be:

GBPUSD – 1.6671 – 1.6677

This is a spread of six pips. They will buy at 1.6671, but they will sell at 1.6677.

Benjamin Wey summarizes

It’s similar to a pawn shop in that you will never be able to sell at the price at which you can buy. That’s how they make their money. Different brokers offer different spreads. They usually get a better spread based on the volume of business they do with a certain financial institution. Once again, it’s not like the stock market. A bank will give Broker 1 a better deal than Broker 2 if Broker 1 brings that bank a great deal more business. Just make sure to go with a reliable broker because regulation is much more lax than the stock market.

Even though it may seem different and confusing, trading in currency is similar to any investment in that you want to buy low and sell high. It can be very risky, but so can many other investments. As I always say: make sure to do your homework before making any investment, currency trading included. But it never hurts to know yet another way you can turn money into more money.

If I, Benjamin Wey, would trade currency on a daily basis, I would strict follow these rules. Good luck trading!

Benjamin Wey is the CEO of New York Global Group and a contributing journalist forTheBlot Magazine

BENJAMIN WEY SAYS, 11 SIGNS IT’S TIME TO QUIT YOUR JOB

BENJAMIN WEY SAYS, 11 SIGNS IT’S TIME TO QUIT YOUR JOB

Everyone needs job.

Long ago, one could get a job with a company and, 40 years later, retire from that same company. Those days are long over, and most of us will have numerous employers before our working lives end. So long as you are the one deciding when to quit, that’s cool. As we all learned during the financial crisis, though, a lot of companies in times of trouble do the deciding for you, and you wind up unemployed through no fault of your own.

That isn’t going to change any time soon, but here’s some advice on how to know when it’s time to jump before you get pushed:

The first clue that you probably need to leave is when top management announces major changes.Think about it: If things were going well, there’d be no reason for change. Business is a conservative environment; you don’t fix things that aren’t broken. Risk is acceptable only to the extent that the rewards justify it. If the rewards are shrinking, you are forced to change. “Adapt or die” is code for update the resume.

Are you part of the team to implement “Project X,” which has been delayed twice and has a new project manager and the budget has been redefined? This is change that isn’t being implemented well.

Do you walk past the conference room and the corner offices and see the big wigs in closed-door meetings all day? Their time is valuable, or at least expensive, and every minute they are together, they aren’t running their own fiefdom in the firm. So whatever it is they are discussing is serious. And when serious things go well, those meetings are short, and they leave the doors open. Long meetings with the door shut means review your LinkedIn profile.

Another hint is to check out the conditions in the accounting department. Are the bean counters working late? Sometimes this is perfectly normal, like right before a regularly scheduled audit. But if the last audit was a few months ago and these guys are burning the midnight oil, it might be a sign that there is more money going out than there is coming in.

Related to that, for those of you who get reimbursed for expenses (travel or whatever), do you get your expenses paid easily and quickly, or is it like pulling teeth weeks, even months, after the fact? If they aren’t paying you, and you’re part of the team, what outside suppliers aren’t getting paid? Probably most of them. And why? Because there isn’t enough cash to take care of everyone.

Did you just get a promotion without a raise attached? Does this promotion give you greater responsibility, or as the bullshitters in H.R. call it, “scope for professional growth?” Without more money, they are trying to get more out of you for free. Let’s try a thought experiment. What would happen if you go to the grocery store and get a loaf of bread and a pound of butter, and offer only to pay for the bread? Even if you call the free butter “a unique professional opportunity,” you aren’t leaving with the stuff. If they don’t want to pay you more for extra work, there could be trouble across the company.

Ever been at a company that has a hiring freeze? Someone leaves the company, and the desk sits unoccupied for months or permanently. It could be that the company has outgrown the need for a person in that role, but more likely, not filling that seat saves some cash. And if you’ve been given some of that person’s duties (without a raise), then you should see if that interview suit still fits.

To get rid of a lot of people at once, management sometimes likes to redraw the organizational chart. Have you had four different supervisors this year? Has your department changed names three times? Are you on a different floor or on the opposite side of the building just because? Beware of employees playing musical chairs.

How’s morale? It’s quite possible for you to be totally miserable, but everyone else is thrilled to pieces to get to work every morning. Or are you the happiest camper in the company despite crying yourself to sleep every night? Bad morale is hard to fix. Better to leave.

When you get to work, do you know what you are supposed to do? Or have they moved the goalposts so many times you have no idea where to begin? You have a function within the organization that contributes to the success of the whole, and if you don’t know what that function is and how it fits into the overall operation, maybe no one else does either.

If you’ve been in the company a couple of years, how many new faces are there? If the answer is “a lot,” that means many people have left. High turnover is never a good sign. You probably ought to join the exodus.

Some people think that quitting a job means that they have failed somehow. Rats abandoning a sinking ship, and that kind of thing. That’s the wrong way to look at it. You’re just firing your employer for failure to perform. If they can do it to you, you ought to be allowed to do the same.

 

China Expert BENJAMIN WEY — Top 3 Cultural Lessons on Doing Business in China

BENJAMIN-WEY-—-TOP-3-CULTURAL-LESSONS-ON-DOING-BUSINESS-IN-CHINA

China expert Benjamin Wey has almost two decades of experience dealing with China.

Europeans and Americans have been trying to figure out how to do business in China quite literally for centuries. Some have been fairly successful, but the Middle Kingdom remains a land of commercial mystery to most outsiders. The reason is fairly simple — almost everything about China is different. A great many business people get caught up in the minutiae of Chinese business culture and forget that we are all human beings trying our best to succeed. In that regard, everything about doing business in China is exactly the same.

Read More: FRAUD SHORT SELLERS TRIGGER REGULATORS’ MISUNDERSTANDING OF REVERSE MERGERS

Meet Benjamin Wey, a proud American financier and a bridge to China

I was born in China and grew up speaking Chinese. I came to America to study business at Oklahoma Baptist University on full scholarships. After earning a second master’s degree in business from Columbia University in New York, and as Craig Ferguson says, I am American on purpose. I am very proud of my Chinese culture, and I chose to become an American citizen. My company has an office in New York and a co-branded office in Beijing. I speak English at work in New York and Chinese or English after work depending on the people around me. In short, I have a foot in both camps.

It took me years to reach this point, and most business people may not have the time or inclination to make that kind of commitment. That gives me an advantage when I do business in China and in the U.S., but anyone can do it. The secret is to do your best with the details but stay focused on the big picture. China expert Benjamin Wey:

Benjamin Wey, Financier, Journalist, CEO, New York Global Group

Benjamin Wey, Financier, Journalist, CEO, New York Global Group

Benjamin Wey on China cultural lesson No. 1: Be patient and be humble 

One of the things that people starting to do business in China always complain about is how long things can take. You don’t fly into Beijing of Shanghai on Monday and leave with signed deal and a check on Friday. But think about it. If you fly from Los Angeles to Miami on Monday, are you likely to get a contract and a check on Friday? Probably not. There’s something in finance called “due diligence.” Basically, that means you check out the other guy to make sure he’s on the up and up. Why? Well, so you don’t get screwed. The Chinese don’t want to get taken any more than you do. They may not have a formal due diligence program or process, but they want to check you out. That’s what the banquets and all that social stuff is about.

Look at it another way: If you play golf with one supplier and just have a professional relationship with another, and all other things are equal, who gets the contract? The fact is that every businessperson on the planet wants to do business with people they can trust, and if you happen to be on friendly terms, so much the better.

Read More: Chinese reverse mergers are not toxic: Stanford University study

Benjamin Wey on China cultural lesson No. 2: Learn from the Chinese history

The last century or so of Chinese history has been chaotic. The Emperor was overthrown and a republic declared. Japan invaded and was defeated. The Nationalists and Communists fought a civil war that the Communists won. Since 1949, China has had the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution as well as an opening to the world with capitalist features. It wasn’t the kind of history that lets a commercial code evolve over time. If America’s contract and property laws were as changeable and flexible as Chinese laws, wouldn’t you want to be able to trust your business associates? Actually, you would need to be able to trust them. In a way, personal trust is going to let you sleep better at night than any number of signed deals.

So during those banquets or coffee and cigarette breaks, talk about the same things you would discuss with someone in your own country in such a circumstance — even if you need an interpreter. Traffic, weather, your hotel, the plane ride all make for good small talk. And for God’s sake, try to be pleasant even if you have had a bad experience. After all, you wouldn’t want a visitor running your city or country down. Don’t try to show off your knowledge of the politics of Tibet and Taiwan any more than you would discuss U.S. party politics with a complete stranger whose account you want. If you find a common interest, that is huge. Work that angle.

Benjamin Wey on China cultural lesson No. 3: Pay attention to details

A little local knowledge is never a bad thing. “Hello,” “goodbye” and “thank you” in any language usually is enough to show you respect the other party. Your interpreter can handle the rest, but try. When in Rome …

And that applies to all the little details, like how to present your business card. Watch what they do, and mimic it. You can’t go too far wrong that way. Why? Because at a very human level, even if you get it not-quite-right, you are trying, and that means you respect them. And you can’t trust someone who doesn’t respect you.

Yes, everything about China is different, but at a very basic level, we all want the same things: success, respect and happiness. In that regard, China and Oklahoma have a lot in common.

Mistakes that will doom your ‘cant miss’ million-dollar idea

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Idea is great. Time is money, but for successful inventors, that truism has special meaning. Most successful inventors will tell you that not spending enough time researching your million-dollar product idea before bringing it to market is the biggest mistake you can make. Read More : http://www.cnbc.com/2015/09/09/invention-is-worth-a-million-ask-yourself-this.html

Benjamin Wey, CEO of New York Global Group, recommends this article.

Investors have been making a mad dash to cash

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This has been the scariest week in stock market history, at least by one significant measure. Though the market’s certainly seen larger downturns, and in fact is on pace to end the week in positive territory, it’s never witnessed investors flee for the exits in the manner they did since the first correction in four years briefly but violently came raining down on Wall Street. Read More: http://www.cnbc.com/2015/08/28/investors-have-been-making-a-mad-dash-to-cash.html

Benjamin Wey, CEO of New York Global Group, recommends this article.